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My 13(a) visa experience

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I am not an attorney, nor an expert, nor do I play one on TV. I am merely relating the experience of the visa process as I experienced it. Don’t take my word as law.

Long article here…

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I’ve been living in the Philippines a total of 27 months now, and I moved here on a tourist visa, extending when I had to extend.

Living here on a tourist visa is entirely possible, though there are a few hiccups that you may encounter:

  1. An ACR is normally required for any type of loans, like a credit card, mortgage or a car loan. (NOT all banks, and some will accept an ACR issued after the second extension)
  2. Likewise, some utilities, like postpaid mobile accounts, normally require residency.
  3. A Philippine driver’s license requires residency.
  4. If you work here and require DOL clearance, residency is required.
  5. If you leave the Philippines and return frequently, without a residence visa, you need to show a ticket out of the country (My job travel occasionally made this a pain)
  6. You normally need residency to buy life or health insurance.
  7. A year of extensions can start getting expensive (Each visit I have made to immigration usually uses up the majority of a work day, with travel and traffic included).

That’s about it, and most of these issues can be circumvented in various ways. However, if you are staying here long-term, it is generally beneficial to obtain residency of some type, if you qualify for the visa. In my case, since Rebecca is Filipina, the 13 (a) is possible. Advantages and disadvantages of the 13 (a):

Advantages:

  1. Much easier to get loans and such. Even if in spouse’s name, your income can be shown. Easier to buy insurance.
  2. No need for a ticket leaving the Philippines. You can come and go as you please.
  3. After the one-year probationary period, the visa is permanent (Though you need to renew your ACR I-card every five years).
  4. You are complying with the spirit of the law (This is a technicality, but if you come as a tourist, it is expected that you leave.)
  5. No need for visa runs.

Disadvantages:

  1. You are subject to an exit travel tax each time you leave. This is in addition to the terminal fee that everyone pays. (I checked with immigration. On a “permanent” ACR, the exit clearance and re-entry permits are part of the I-card, so no need to apply in advance of leaving the country. You do, however, still need to pay the tax.) This is an issue for me, since I travel frequently for work, probably adding 40,000 pesos per year to my expenses.
  2. It takes time and patience with the process. (Though it is not difficult, it could be a hassle if you are living far from an immigration office.)

In theory, you should obtain the 13 (a) before leaving your home country. However, in reality, if your spouse applies after you are here (more on that further down), it is not a big deal as long as you have a minimum of 30 days of stay on your passport. You can extend before applying, if you need more time than you have remaining. This was the major rub with me: At my last job, I didn’t sit still long enough to complete the process, due to work obligations. I was in and out so often that I didn’t have time.

The process was simple, though it took four separate trips to immigration for the entire process. The biggest pain will be getting the authenticated copies of all of the documents that you will need. As a precaution, obtain extras of all documents for future use. NOTE: I DID NOT NEED, NOR DID I USE, A FIXER. Repeat that. Repeat it again. When you look online, you will read many, many horrible stories about how much hassle the visa is, how much it costs, or how much time it takes. All of that is pure, 100% bulls**t. The process is easy, and, though immigration can be crowded (and a bit confusing), the staff are generally helpful, respectful, and polite. In fact, it was the other foreigners there who were causing more problems (When, oh when, will Indians or Arabs learn what a queue is???).

What was needed (Direct from the BI web site):

Checklist of Requirements for Non-Quota Immigrant by Marriage Under Section 13(a)

  1. Duly notarized letter of application by the Filipino spouse; (Your spouse is actually requesting your admittance on your behalf. The BI web site,http://immigration.gov.ph/, has the sample text to download and they have a notary inside the BI building. Just like anywhere else, notarized documents must be signed in the presence of the notary).
  2. General Application Form duly accomplished and notarized (BI Form No. MCL-07-01); (Notarize at BI. They have photographs available there for 4 for 100 pesos).
  3. NSO authenticated copy of Birth certificate of Filipino spouse; (This must be ordered in advance and can be a real hassle. Note that the certificate must be on security paper. Old certificates are not valid.)
  4. NSO authenticated copy of the Marriage Contract of alien and Filipino spouse or authenticated by the Philippine embassy/consulate nearest to or in the place where the marriage was solemnized; (We were married in the province. It took 8 months for the authenticated copy to be available at the NSO. Plan in advance and be prepared to wait.)
  5. Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clearance Certificate; and (They give you this at immigration when you file the application).
  6. Plain photocopy of passport of alien spouse showing dates of arrival and authorized stay.(You can make copies at the BI. Bring your spouse’s passport for ID also. If you need to extend, do this first and ask for at least two months extension to allow for any delays.)

Process, first visit:

So, we headed to the BI in Intramuros, documents ready to go. I needed to extend, so that process took one hour (Remember to bring the extension fees in addition). We then queued for around 15 minutes for an officer to check our copies and documents (important!), and gathered the missing extra copies. Another queue for notarization, about 30 minutes. We filed the application, paid at the cashier, and were given a receipt for my passport, along with a hearing date five days later. This is a court hearing, and is covered under the next section. Total costs for the process on day 1:

13(A) VISA FEES

Fee for section 13(a) initial one year probationary period:

1.Upon filing

Application fee P1,010.00
*Express lane fee P   500.00 (Just pay it!)

Extension fees:

TOURIST (NON-RESTRICTED) ADMITTED INITIALLY FOR 30 DAYS MAY BE EXTENDED FOR ANOTHER 38 DAYS

Visa Waiver P   500.00
Visa Waiver Application Fee 1,000.00
Certification Fee 500.00
Express fee (Certification) 500.00
Express fee (For processing) 500.00
Legal Research Fee (LRF) for each item P    10.00

Fees for obtaining documents ran about 3,000 pesos with the costs of couriers and so on.

Process, second visit:

So, the hearing was scheduled five days later, at 14:00. Your spouse MUST accompany you in person. This hearing is the actual formal petitioning by your spouse for your continued residence in the Philippines. The hearing is not in front of a judge, but rather, a BI attorney who reviews the application, verifies that your spouse exists, and “signs off” on the application. There is a 30-day waiting period for the application to be reviewed by BI officials. If you need to leave the Philippines during this period (I did), you need to advise the BI at this time. The hearing took approximately 10 minutes total time, though, be aware NOT to be late and miss the hearing, or the process begins again and the fees are charged again. You are given a telephone number after the hearing to call and check your application’s status after the 30 day period. Keep ALL receipts. Your passport is returned to you now (Not yet stamped).

Cost: No cost at this stage of the process.

Process, Third visit:

So, I called on the 30th day, and was notified that my application was approved. You can finalize the visa on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Intramuros. You have the option of paying an extra 500 pesos for “Double Express” for 2 – 4 hour service, or “Single Express” for 10-hour service. I chose double so that I could get the process finished.

Short queue, you give them your passport, and they obtain your file. Wait 30 minutes for processing. Pay the fees at the cashier. You then return , depending on the Double or Single express service chosen, at the appointed time. You are given your now-stamped passport, and directed to the ACR application queue.

Cost for visa implementation:

2.Upon implementation

ACR and form fee P1,050.00
Change of status fee P   600.00
Passport visa fee P   200.00
CRTV and form fee P1,450.00
Implementation fee P1,000.00
Legal research fee P     10.00 / item
Head tax P   250.00

At the ACR station, another application to fill out, along with copies of your new visa. You are then fingerprinted (Free, but bring wipes to clean your hands) and you pay the ACR fees at the cashier. Your fingerprints are taken one more time (electronically, this time) and the photo for your I-card is now taken. You are given a receipt and telephone number to call after seven days. Time required: one hour, including fingerprints.

Costs for ACR: US$50 (Charged in dollars for some reason, but roughly 2,500 pesos)

Process, Fourth visit:

Very simple. Stand in a short queue to pick up your new ACR I-card after calling to verify that it is ready. Total time: 10 minutes, no additional cost.

The 13 (a) you are issued is valid for one year, and probationary. In other words, don’t do anything stupid and break the law. After one year (90 days before it expires… IMPORTANT!), you can petition for the probationary visa to become permanent. You still have to appear at the BI during the first two months of the new year and pay the fee.

This process was very simple, even though you feel like cattle a bit. I really don’t believe that a fixer would have made anything any quicker. Perhaps on the review after the hearing, but I can’t see why it would be worth the risk unless you needed to travel far to reach immigration and get things done in a more timely manner. Keep in mind that I am not an attorney, nor an expert. Complicated or unusual cases probably would go smoother with an attorney involved, or one may be necessary. In my case, it was straightforward, since I was married here, and my wife and I have both behaved ourselves with no legal snafus. The first step, should you have questions, is to simply call immigration and ASK. Please note: It can be tough to find answers on these topics that are reliable. The small canteen connected to immigration is where the employees all take their breaks (smoke and otherwise). Chit chatting with them informally is a great way to find out the real scoop. They are friendly and are acting like people there, rather than government officials. Just mind your manners and remember that they are taking a break! They were very helpful in answering questions with which I was unclear. You might as well, since you will have a good bit of wait time.

Keep in mind, though this seems like a real hassle, this is much easier than most other countries’ immigration procedures. Nearly every country has very high fees (Filipinos pay over US$1,000 by the time they get a US green card. My current Korean residence visa cost around $3,000, and my UAE residence visa from four years ago cost around $4,000, so, really, no complaining about fees! The documents required by the UAE were onerous, at best, to obtain, and very expensive), and most countries require substantial time and documentation. Consider yourself lucky that the Philippines has many, many visa options that are relatively straightforward.

JohnM

John Miele is a Citizen of the World, having spent time in many locations around the globe. Currently, he finds himself in Manila, but travels throughout the Philippines. John joined the Live in the Philippines Web Magazine in mid-2008.

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John Reyes
Guest

Wow, John, so many queues, so many processes, and so many different fees. Sounds like everything revolves around money. How does one manage to navigate through this bureaucratic maze without losing it, especially when it’s probably so crowded and so hot in those offices and you’re so hungry and you feel like you need to brush your teeth, then you have some schmuck bucking the line. I get a kick out of those express lanes, singles and doubles yet!!! I say, U.S. supermarket checkout lanes, or better yet, any state Department of Motor Vehicles, can learn from Filipino ingenuity when… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

John: Correct… Lots of queues. Being patient is the most important thing. Never forget where you are standing!

Jack Hawkins
Guest
Jack Hawkins

Dear John,
Could you tell me if I need to go back to the Philippines to renew my ACR-I-CARD..13a visa..or is there a way to do this on line? All information will be really helpful..My wife is going back In May, of 2013..Could she do this for me?

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John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Jack: The ACR must be done in person.

John
Guest
John

I’m on a probationary 13A. I will be working overseas and have 1 or 2 weeks of vacation before it expires. Do I need to be present for all steps in the process? Can my wife go there alone and pay the fee (step 2) without me present? I know you are not the expert, but that is my situation as I forsee it.

RadarLove
Guest
RadarLove

Your damn right you need a lot of patience and tolerance my 13A took another 3 months from application the girl in immigration Manila told me they had a backlog. This is how it really is your visa goes through so many hands one weak link and it delays the whole system and we went to Cebu to do ours and on reflection direct in Manila is best and you know they’ve got the paperwork. Looking at my card they’ve backdated it a month from when it is issued all about money then again we will apply earlier for the… Read more »

Mike P
Guest
Mike P

As of 09/2016 all foreigners MUST get their NBI clearance at the main office on United Nations in Manila.

MindanaoBob
Guest

That is not my experience. Just within the last 3 days, I helped a foreigner process a permanent Visa here in Davao. He was able to do his clearance right here in Davao.

Nick Nichols
Guest
Nick Nichols

John – I also finally got around to getting my residency visa this past year. But I haven’t taken a trip out of the country yet (with my new iCard).

Is the exit travel tax paid at the airport without prior arrangement? Or do you do something a day or so ahead of time?

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Nick: From what I was told, as long as you have the Icard, airport is fine (or you can still go to immigration in advance). I leave for China tomorrow, so it will be my first try with the process since I got the new visa.

Gary
Guest
Gary

Let us know if anything unexpected occurs regarding travel.

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Gary: Everything went smoothly… Only difference was a stop at the immigration office (at the right in Terminal 1, same hall as passport control, and there is a small sign with an arrow pointing the way hanging from the ceiling that says “ACR Icard holders”), give them passport, ACR, and boarding pass, and pay the P 2,160 exit tax (Note that this is in addition to the P 750 terminal fee that everyone pays). They then escorted me to the diplomat’s lane at passport control (no extra waiting) for stamping. Very easy, and actually quicker since I had no queue… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Gary: On an additional note, even though the tax is added, it still worked out cheaper than having to buy an outbound ticket on my return, so the cost sorta evens out in the end.

Gary
Guest
Gary

Thanks John. For some reason I thought you had to get some sort of pre-approval, but this actually sounds like a breeze.

Steve
Guest
Steve

Hi John. Steve here. I have 13a with the respective newly renewed 5-year ACR-I card and will visit my kids in the USA soon. If I understand you correctly I will pay the P750 terminal fee and go to immigration with passport, ACR-I card, boarding pass and enough pesos to pay the exit travel tax and that’s it! Am I correct? Very helpful as I have never left the Philippines yet in 14 years. Thank you.

robert fernandez
Guest
robert fernandez

do you think that my applying to a resident visa to avoid extension fees can affect my wife’s current U.S. visa process? I am currently a U.S. citizen.

Richie
Guest
Richie

Hey John, Thanks for the input, my future wife to be and I are trying to get everything going… my plan is to leave by June here… with me closing everything down here in Texas… its going to cost me along with my ticket around 3500 dollars, I will be able to take the rest of my 2500 dollars of the 6000 I would have saved up to do all this, with me to take care of the cost of everything else when I get there… from what I see, that will help tremendously for me! Quick question though, what… Read more »

Buddy
Guest

i lived in the PI for 13 years and hope to return soon. However, I am retired with a pension, I question you finding a “job” there that would support you the way you are used to. Maybe, you could teach in the numerous international schools, Good luck.

MindanaoBob
Guest

It depends on the person and what type of work, Buddy. For example, I have lived here for 13 years now, and I make a lot more money here than I ever made in the States. So, it can be done.

Dave Naylor
Guest
Dave Naylor

Hi Bob

What do you think of living in Mindanao? I ask this because my Filippine wife and I are coming to live in the Dipolog area in April this year

Regards

Dave

MindanaoBob
Guest

I love living in Davao, Dave. Not sure I would like Dipolog… I like the larger city where there are more amenities.

Tommy
Guest
Tommy

Hi Dave,

we live in Dipolog for 2 years now , all i can say is that it’s a safe place to live,not too big a city but there’s lot of stuff to do, my favorite place here is Dakak Resort..the only thing i don’t like much is the traffic and the way pople drive here but i’m sure you’ll get use to it..:) wish you’ll like living here

ProfDon
Guest
ProfDon

Thank you for this clear, step by step explanation. Many of us will benefit from what you have written!

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

ProfDon: You’re welcome! Glad you found it useful.

Dave Naylor
Guest
Dave Naylor

Hi John
I liked your in-depth article on phils visas, so can you please enlighten me on the best way for me to go. I have single tickets for my wife and I who is a Filipina to travel to Cebu, we are emigrating for the for-see-able future

My Q is this ” we will claim balikbyan priviledge so we can stay for 12 months without any visa ( I think!!). So what are the overall charges for us to do this. Or is it better to get either the SRRV Classic visa or the 13a non-quota visa?

Mohammad Asad Ullah
Guest
Mohammad Asad Ullah

Hi. I am Bangladeshi .TRV visa for 2 years i will pay 25000.00 to big for us.Unfair for me.They don’t give me duel visa too.
Gov. must think about us here earn too little and pay big.

Richard
Guest
Richard

Great article John, I am planning on retiring in the RP in a couple years. I am thinking after reading your story and others it might be to my advantage to do all this at the Philippine Consulate here in Los Angeles. How long before my move would you say I should start working on this. My marriage to a Filipina was here in Los Angeles as I brought her here on a K1 visa a couple years ago.
Again Very informative and I thank you for sharing..

MindanaoBob
Guest

Hi Richard – I hope John doesn’t mind if I jump in here, since I got my 13 series visa in the USA. I got mine from the San Francisco consulate in April 2000. That’s been 10 years ago, so things may have changed a bit in that time. When I got my visa (and Feyma and all of our kids got 13 series visas at the same time) it took about 3 weeks to complete the entire process. As I recall, once the visa is issued you have 60 or 90 days to actually move to the Philippines. If… Read more »

Randall Jessup
Guest
Randall Jessup

Hi Bob, I’m currently in the Philippines going through the process of getting my ACR-I Card in at the Cebu BI. I applied for the 13a) Visa at the Consulate in Toronto, Canada. They told me it was good for one year and that I had to move to the Philippines within the one year otherwise I would have to start all over from the beginning. Well I arrived 6 months after they issued the Visa to me in Canada. BI in Cebu then sent me to the Department of Quarantine. There they told me that all my supporting medical… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Randall: The ACR process is also different on the permanent visas vs. the quick one you receive from extending twice. The time is due to paperwork review.

Jim
Guest

Hi Bob- Like you I obtained my 13a Visa abroad in the Philippine Embassy in London but I got it on the same day as I presented my application. The important thing for me was liasing with the Philippine consulate in advance making sure I had all the correct papers etc. My 13a Visa gave me 12 months to enter the Philippines or reapply. When I did my ACR I card in Manila it took 2 days (Used a fixer) sorry John but had no problems. John you never mentioned medical requirements which I had to obtain in the UK… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Jim: See my note to Richard above… If you apply in the Philippines, medical and police are not required. Abroad, they are (Why, I don’t know. Perhaps they figure that you are already here legally?).

I totyally agree on the docs… If you have everything ready and don’t play games, things go much, much smoother.

Francisco San Giorgio
Guest
Francisco San Giorgio

Bob didn’t get a 13a in the US, he got a 13g.

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Bob: No issue… The procedure is different there. Also note that anyone getting the visa in the States will STILL have to visit immigration for their ACR. Also, from whyat I understand, the visas issued overseas now are also probationary. Previously, the permanent vs. probationary might have made it more advantageous, given the extra docs required in the States. Now though, I’m not so sure.

Sherman Danio
Guest
Sherman Danio

Hey John, Want to thank you so very much for your professional presentation of the steps and cost involved with getting the A13 Visa! I married a wonderful lady here and decided to remain. We live in Carmen near Panabo! There are some down sides to living here but I love the people and especially my wife’s family! I have a vast amount of work experience and wondered what the prospects for work is here. I am 72 but not the usual 72. I am as fit as any 45 year old man and stronger then most. So working is… Read more »

MindanaoBob
Guest

Hello, If you are interested in living in the Philippines, but you need a source of income, getting a job here is generally not the way to go.  Firstly, most companies are not looking to hire foreigners.  Secondly, you probably won’t want to work for the kind of wages offered here, usually only a few dollars per day. To help out people like you, I have written a book called “49 Ways to earn a living in the Philippines” and I cover ideas of all sorts on how you can earn a good living while living in the Philippines.  I… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Richard: Bob’s comments about six months sound about right. Biggest hassle will be getting any documents from the Philippines and getting them authenticated. That takes time. After you move here, copies of the same documents (Like birth certificates) are often required for many different things (Like mortgages or other countries’ visas), so I strongly suggest ordering multiple copies since you most likely WILL need them. IMPORTANT NOTE: The requirements when applying overseas are different. I only required the documents I listed because I applied here…. It takes longer and more hassle here, but fewer docs. You will also need a… Read more »

kevin
Guest
kevin

Hi John can you tell me how much i would have to pay in visa cost in for a one year period ? Visitors visa this would be
cheers Kev

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Kevin: I was in and out so much that I only rarely extended, but here’s a close guess (plus or minus a few ‘000) It was costing me about 3,000 every extension (to 60 days). So, adding it up (plus the I card cost after 60 days): First 21 days: Free Extend to 59 days: 3,000 Non resident I-card: 3,500 next 120 days: Around 7,000 (These are actually fines for “overstaying”, even though you are “approved”. After 6 months, certificate of residence: 1,400 Add about 4,500 for your extension to 1 year. Add 2,000 for exit clearance. One year visa… Read more »

Dave Starr
Guest

Thanks, John for a good run-down. I may actually go get my visa soon … and then not … since I travel very seldom, once a year at most, the BB stamp is still serving me fine. One thing I’d like to add for all the folks looking for the detailed answers that always pop up on an article like this … the rule is, YMMV … Your Mileage May Vary. Trying, for example, to calculate the yearly cost of renewing a tourist visa is fruitless, for example, becuase over the course of the 16 months that I was living… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Dave: Totally agree… Thr rules change frequently, and the satellite offices may be different. Calling is always best. I had looked into an attorney handling this, and it is certainly not cheap. It may appear intimidating, but once started, not so bad.

lenny2000
Guest
lenny2000

You have to be married to obtain a 13 a…correct?

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Lenny: Correct. There are other visa types available (Including quota) if you are not married, so browse the BI site and see if another category may suit you better.

Bryan G
Guest
Bryan G

Like Jim I got my 13a in London – the Embassy was absolutely marvelous. My wife restored her Philippine nationality in the morning and I was granted the visa in the afternoon.The Embassy personnel were so helpful and the interview with the Consul was completely informal. Even when we got back to Manila the procedure at Intramuros and Quarantine was not a big deal. It would have been even easier if a document was provided giving information as to how many copies of each document were required.The only complaint I have is the digital photograph on my I.card is distorted… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Bryan: That is why I suggested above to get several copies of documents. You will eventually need them here anyway.

Real Name----Kurt Van Tassel
Guest
Real Name----Kurt Van Tassel

Last year was my 10th visit to the Philippines since 2001. I married my wife on my second vist in 2002. She is now a dual citizen. I retired last year and our plan was to find a place in the Davao area and live there at least half the year returning to the states evey 5 or 6 months for a couple of months so I could see my kids. I also liked the idea of being so close to many other countries worth visiting and especially the reasonable airfares to get me there and back. Figuring a 13A… Read more »

MindanaoBob
Guest

Hi Kurt – I just had to comment on this. Every heard of the “Ugly American” – unfortunately, it seems that you fit the name to a tee. can’t buy land – USA lets immigrants. can’t own a gun – USA lets immigrants. etc. etc. Maybe somebody forgot to tell you – we are no longer in the USA… this is the Philippines. If you had even a small bit of knowledge about Philippine law, these things would have been obvious to you. If you want to do these things, you can always become a citizen if you like. I… Read more »

Real Name----Kurt Van Tassel
Guest
Real Name----Kurt Van Tassel

Bob—I am sorry if you believe my actions make you look bad. Is this another of their trates? Judging all on the actions of one? Persoanally , after my last trip , I would not even consider an exteded stay and would never return if my wife was not from there. Just FYI , I am in the process of writing a book in an attempt to educate American citizens on how we are giving our country away. It is my hope to eventually force congress to enact laws that would treat those coming to this country the same way… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Kurt: As I wrote above, the Philippines is easier and cheaper than many other places. Visas for residence are required to live in every country: or you are illegal. I cannot think of a single place on earth that isn’t so. As to owning land and guns: Again, the Philippines is hardly unique. Want to try Singapore? You cannot own land there, and if you get caught with a gun there, long jail sentence. Use that gun there (even if nobody is injured), and it is a mandatory death sentence. Most of the Caribbean islands restrict land ownership by foreigners,… Read more »

MindanaoBob
Guest

Hi Kurt – It is not one of “their” traits. It is a human trait. Do you mean to tell me that you don’t do the same? Do you judge Mexicans based on the illegal aliens in the USA? I feel sure that you do, at least to some extent, because that is just how the human brain works. It sounds like you have given up on the Philippines, based on a few of the laws which are there to protect the Filipinos. Some of them I do not like either, but I look for the good instead of the… Read more »

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

Bob: This “Us vs Them” attitude is largely what I read online before getting the visa (On other sites). Kurt stated something that I think is highly relevant: “There are several Ex-pat communities in Davao with members more than willing to help the new kids on the block and what makes it so nice is that many have alreay done battle with the different pprocesses.” Viewing this as a battle… Not a good way to start a new life. I have an inkling that he is a member of that expat group in Davao that bitches and moans all of… Read more »

MindanaoBob
Guest

Exactly, John. Kurt talked about having “paid all that money” for the visa… a few hundred dollars? Like you say, if a few hundred bucks is a lot of money to you, you really can’t afford to move here anyway.

Todd
Guest
Todd

Bob, Not to say Kurt was right in any way! Just wanted to say every penny counts with me! Some people say I’m cheap! Even my Filipino Wife probably thinks that of me but doesn’t say anything even though i make 65,000 + I’m this way because it can be taken from you in a heartbeat, I know first hand after losing my job for about a year and a half life was rough all that time but now that I’m back on my feet again i still tend to be tight with the money. So i hope that doesn’t… Read more »

Real Name----Kurt Van Tassel
Guest
Real Name----Kurt Van Tassel

Guys——–My only reason for considering a move in that direction is or was for the happiness of my wife. I am not into bragging and I hardly feel this to be the place it should be done anyway but lets just say I worked very long and hard for the money I have socked away and we are now looking at 100 plus acre tracts in Colorado as an alternative. Having worked for a company for 40 years and retiring with benefits , I was amazed to find out my BCBS insurance was good in Davao at two different doctors… Read more »

MindanaoBob
Guest

Kurt – You’re living in a dream world! Good luck to you, you’re gonna need it.

Jan
Guest

quote: As soon as I passed through immigration I cut my card into pieces and left it on the floor for them to wonder at. end quote I wouldn’t be surprised that one of the officers picked up those pieces and reported the incident to his superior. Could be that if Kurt is entering the Philippines next time he will be denied to enter the country for that behaviour of destroying Philippine property on purpose. I believe that Kurt has no reason at all to live or stay in this country. He seem to forget that he will be a… Read more »

John Miele
Guest

Jan: I wouldn’t be surprised by that either… A really unwise move in any event.

Pablo Santiago AKA PJ McCartney
Guest
Pablo Santiago AKA PJ McCartney

@ Kurt..
Umm.. Did you see Rambo IV? Reminds me of the “Christian Missionaries” wanting to “Change things” ..
Quote: John Rambo: “what you’re trying to do is change what is”
Quote: Sarah: “What IS?”
Quote: John Rambo: “Go home”..
I once has dreams of changing the corruption here.. rattling cages.. making things “better”.. but as Bob said Kurt, that’s the “Dream World”.. even an army of foreigners who “care” cannot “change” things. Not here.. not ANYWHERE.. until the PEOPLE want it as badly as they want the air they breathe. It’s not our “Battle” my friend.. it’s theirs. Good Luck

trevor
Guest
trevor

well it might just be worth considering how expensive it is to try to get into the u.k now philipino or american 50.000 in the bank there and a job to walk into that pays at least 19.000 per year which belive me is not easy for most that live in the uk. so it looks more than reasonable what is charged in phil.they dont require any of these things,plus the people of phil who most, have very little could learn most of the rest of the world a thing or two,when it comes to getting by on things that… Read more »

Richie
Guest
Richie

MindanoBob: What is the 13g < would I not have to do the 13a first? Basically confused here… and I am in a very big bind on TIME, my time will only allow me work for 2 months in construction <siding) in Driftwood, Tx. then, I have to leave, I am basically pushing it when my sister did not even want me in the back yard in the shed… < that is where I am at man, in a shed… I hope that when I come and get with my wife… the business she wanted to start, she has started…… Read more »

MindanaoBob
Guest

If you need a 13g, you cannot get a 13a. A 13g is a visa for a person who is married to a former Philippine citizen. A 13a is for somebody is married to a Philippine citizen. If your wife is a Philippine citizen you get a 13a. If she used to be a Philippine citizen but is no longer a citizen then you need a 13g.

Cemlyn
Guest
Cemlyn

Nice one Bob. Kurt said he would not return, all the better for the rest of us. I am not married to my beautiful baby yet ( there is a bit of legal work needed for that !!) but once we are then I will apply for the 13a straight away. Does anyone here know how difficult/easy it is to get a 1 year, multiple exit/re-enry visitor visa ?? Next question. I lived in Puerto Galera for most of last year. The visiting immigration staff from Calopan were obsoletely superb. The best I have come across in any immigration office… Read more »

David S
Guest
David S

Great explanation John! Out of curiosity can you obtain travel visas for U.S. citizens at Philippine embassies in countries other than the U.S.? What I mean is: get a 1 year travel visa. At the end of the year pop over to Hong Kong and get a new one. It would be cheaper than extending visas.

John Miele
Guest
John Miele

David: In most countries, in order to get a visa issued, you need to be resident. Because of document forgeries, etc. they usually won’t issue visas otherwise: Even visit or travel visas. There are exceptions (China from HKG, Myanmar from BKK), but normally the answer is “no”. Recommend contacting the embassy first.

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