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The Rain is Coming My Way

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Let’s talk about our roof here in the Philippines, especially here on Luzon where we are but a few weeks from the rainy season (Monsoons). In Boston we had high gabbled roofs to aid in the disposing of the falling snow and that has not happened yet here in Dinalupihan Bataan so I don’t need that type

I noticed as I traveled in areas prone to Cyclones, hurricanes and typhoons that the slab (Flat) roof was preferred. When I inquired as to the reason it was explained to me that wind had a difficult time of blowing off flat roofs. I have been in many typhoons and hurricanes both on land and at sea and thought about it. Then I said “The roof deal doesn’t matter much at sea… well then they pointed to the Air Craft Carriers with a flat roof! Okay; that was lesson #1

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This is not a lecture as to what type of roof you should have, as a matter of fact if a thatched roof is your desire more power to you. This is about what sort of roofs I have on my house in Bataan, a cement slab roof, waterproofed with rubber barriers and Sahara mixed cement (waterproofed) plus rubber based Boysen Roof Guard paint. True there is a gabled roof on the man cave, but it’s protected by the house which blocks most of the wind.

In Florida and Puerto Rico I also had houses and bars that had slab roofs, they flooded inside but the roof was attached when the storm went away. The flooding was another warning or lesson #2: “Paul; move off the beach you idiot and keep your feet dry.”So mountains were what I sought out when I came to the Philippines.

Mountains will also provide gravity and rain water will seek its own lever which happens to be lower than where I live. Also mountains weaken typhoons. Yes I put a little thought into where I was going to live in the tropics. Paul learns lesson #3

My neighbor’s prefer the slanted tin roof with the old tires up there to aid in the breeding of mosquitoes and by not painting them they save countless dollars. Behind me the guy treated his roof with vinegar and it smelled like a salad for a week and then painted it with a water based house paint I’ll assume he had laying around. Three weeks into last years rainy season the roof was bare metal again. Now before anyone shouts that I have more money, than him, allowed to point out that yes he is Pinoy, but sails as a US Merchant Marine. Money was not the problem, being cheap was.

In 2013 we had the fringes of five big storms and countless small squalls that hit my area. All were rain driven by wind that broke through the edges of my roof where the walls connect and allowed a very small amount of water damage to the interior. It was nothing major, major but a sizable pain in the butt. In January I power washed my roofs and scraped the old chalking along all the walls. I have 7 three inch drains to remove rain water from my roof but the wind driven rain is the one that will getcha.

In the middle of buying the car, my wife Mayang decided that the roof was clean now and needed to be weatherproofed. Don’t worry honey the US Government will crap some more money on us in a day or two. In fact she didn’t seem concerned at all. First the crew arrives headed up by my brother-in-law Juhn He always provides a quality job, and since he is paid by the day he takes his time to ensure the job is done correctly. But you already knew that.

First the crew chalks ever square inch, well not really every inch but every crack and crevasse and or fissure they could find. Truthfully, take your time boys this is what I wanted to happen and I just let economics lead the parade. Cold beer and my mouth shut worked just fine for me. Now for the painting, of course I purchased the same Boysen Roof Shield or Roof Guard (I never get that right), the simple reason is, it did last 14 years the last time, but the cheap stuff you’ll by every year over and over, buy the good stuff once. Lesson # 4 (BTW no vinegar was used).

In 1993, I was visiting my folks on Cape Cod, when my dad’s 25 year old Sony TV showed its last “Price is Right”. We went to a big box store and he asked what brand of TV I would recommend? I just asked; “How long did that Sony Last?” He bought a new Sony.

We did the patio roof, the man cave roof, the laundry area roof and the car port. Then Mayang pointed out one more roofs on our upstairs bedroom also has a roof, hey, I forgot, or might I blame the beer?

So as the rainy seasons rapidly approaches’ I’m as prepared as I can be, I enclosed a picture of my neighbor “Rooster Man’s” house and lot, his roof will be ready as soon as he places the used tires and hollow blocks up there. Feed for the roosters is vastly more important than a dry place fur his kids to live.

Last year my friend in Olongapo lost his steel truss and tile roof to a typhoon, instead of using the insurance money to lay a slab roof, he rebuilt the old roof, well some habits die hard even with Kano’s. But if it snows his roof is ready!

Once more, in no way am I telling anyone that my way is the only way to go, but after countless typhoons I’ve yet to sustain any damage to our house since we built it in 1999. All I’m saying is’ I did it my way! This article is just food for thought.

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Paul Thompson

Paul Thompson; has resided in the Philippines since 1993, living close to Subic Bay. I’m married to a wonderful girl named Maria (AKA Mayang).Who is from Gordon Heights in Olongapo where she grew up with her Mom & Dad and seven siblings Our two daughters are both grown up and have left the nest, the eldest married to a wonderful guy named Chris, and they have blessed us with our granddaughter Heather Colleen Our youngest daughter and her husband Cecil have blessed us with a grandson named. Jayden Logan. I’m a retired U.S. NAVY Senior Chief after 22 years of active duty. After retirement from the Navy I lived for 7 years in Puerto Rico as a Night Club owner. Then Hurricane Hugo told me to find a new line of work, I was hired by Military Sealift Command and went back to sea in Asia as a Merchant Seaman for 10 years. After 30 plus years at sea I buried my anchor on a mountain in the Philippines and am now residing in Dinalupihan (or DinBat for short), Roosevelt, Bataan where we built our home. And last but not least, anything I writes will be pure "Tongue in Cheek "If anybody is offended, I'll lose no sleep over it, but here's a quick Mea Culpa in advance!

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John Reyes
8 years ago

LOL Paul, true to form, the top deck of your house reminds me of the top deck of an aircraft carrier bristling with antennas, radars and early warning systems. Perhaps you can add a replica of WWII Spitfire fighter plane on your deck to complete the picture. 🙂

John Reyes
8 years ago
Reply to  Paul Thompson

Jokes aside, Paul, you really do know how to protect your investment. Good looking slab roof to boot. I guess your experiences living in both tropical islands of Puerto Rico, and now the Philippines, where the whims of Mama nature could spell disaster if you’re not prepared have served you well. Now, as the typhoon season approaches, I can see you sitting back in your Captain’s chair in the comfort of your home during the strongest of winds and rain and just smile when PAGASA issues warning no. 4! Albeit with your heart in your throat, I’ll bet, especially when… Read more »

Rick Lowe
8 years ago
Reply to  Paul Thompson

That’s why they call them the PAG-Guessers!

Looks like SH-3 capable, if the Marines had to land to quell any disturbance with your neighbors the Amphibious Ready Group would have to repel from a CH-53 for sure!

Tim
Tim
8 years ago

Nice job! Very informative. One question? Tough to tell from the pics, but are there drains on the flat roof? How many and where does the water drain to? My wife’s family cinder block house with thatched roof has terrible drainage problem and pools up on the sides of the house. I’m trying to get them to put some drain pipes in to run-off to the bigger drain pipe on the street.

Tim
Tim
8 years ago
Reply to  Paul Thompson

Thanks Paul. Yes, you’re right, need to replace thatch with metal roof. Plan is to put a fence up first, (almost done!) then put all the materials for a roof, and other renovations, behind the fence so they don’t wander off 🙂

bigp
bigp
8 years ago

You look good on the roof Paul, looks like a good place to drink a few SMBs on a cloudy day.

bigp
bigp
8 years ago
Reply to  Paul Thompson

Sounds like fun & the neighbor should appreciate the empties. Turning 69 at Texas Joe’s with you and the ladys was a lot more fun than hitting 70 here in Colorado after another night of freezing weather making sure the last of the new fruit would not make it this year of 2014 in the cycle of the big warm up of the globe.

bigp
bigp
8 years ago
Reply to  Paul Thompson

Hopefully late October or early November. If we get a couple more nights of freezing weather maybe a few months sooner.

papaduck
papaduck
8 years ago
Reply to  bigp

Loren
Happy 70th birthday. You need to get back here soon to break in Paul’s new old roof.

bigp
bigp
8 years ago
Reply to  papaduck

Thanks Papaduck and I am looking forward to my first SMB’s in my 70 year.

Philip Nell
8 years ago

Great posting Paul. I too will do this.

AJ UK
AJ UK
8 years ago

Paul

You’ve convinced me, flat roof going onto the new house design! Sitting up there drinking beer? Might need an electrical socket or two for the beer fridge as I wouldn’t want the moment spoiled by having to walk up and down the stairs all afternoon/evening.

Tagay

AJ UK

Russell Clement
Russell Clement
8 years ago

Hi Paul ,, Informative Article as usual ,, I’m about to find out as its my first job on arrival ,, fix the leaky roof 🙁
I was wondering if you has considered using 2pak paint ,,, its an International Protective Coating product called ,, InterPlus 1180
We’ve just done hundreds of square meters here on workshop floors ,, blast it clean ,, mix it , apply it with a 25 mm nap roller,,,
The initial out-lay would be more but may work less expensive in the long run,,,
PS ,, I’ll bring a bottle of rum when I come,,

Philip John Lynch
8 years ago

Great article Paul given me some great ideas for the house I just bought in Cebu. Thanks

Bill S.
Bill S.
8 years ago

So thats the guy you were talking about next door, with the 30 roosters huh, looks way to close to sleep though that each morning, but maybe thats why you get up so early. It looks like your roof is just bare concrete with the rubberized paint you applied for the water-proofing, so you dont have a rubber membrain thats glued to the concrete do you, or maybe they dont do membrain roofs there, I dont know. 14 years sounds to be very good longevity though for rubberized paint, in that kind of heat. You happen to know how thick… Read more »

Bill S.
Bill S.
8 years ago
Reply to  Paul Thompson

So a 3’x3′ square of your roof would weigh 2000lbs, since its 1/2 a yard of concrete at 18″ thick. I have no idea how large a roof surface you have, but I dont see it possible any kind of storm moving your roof, walls possibly since they would be bearing the wind load, but not the roof. Did you do poured concrete walls also, or filled cinder block. Sounds like concrete slab roof might be the way, and just do a shallow pitch hip roof, if I can find a way to make it look more ornamental maybe. I… Read more »

Bill
8 years ago

Paul,

Your articles are always informative. Nicely done!

Thank you!

Bill

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