aaron2

North to Alaska (and way west too)

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Well, this is going to be an interesting year for me, and I think for readers of this site as well.

I have some plans for this site, Ways to Make a Living, and today I want to share one of those plans with you!

Throwaway Ticket Service - The Business that works while you sleep

Last year, 2016, was a tough year for us.  I had a heart attack in June, and needed to have a heart bypass operation in November. The costs of that were tremendous.  I was lucky, I have a very large network of friends and through GoFundMe, I was able to raise a lot of money to help with the costs involved for the health issues. However there are ongoing costs that we have to cover.  It seems like I am going to several doctors each week, lots of lab tests and such.  It all adds up, you can be sure.

To help defray the costs and to  build up our financial situation a bit, we have a plan.  It all started about a year ago when a friend of mine, Dave Starr, told me about a friend that he had met.  Like me, Dave lives in the Philippines, although he lives in the northern part of the country and I live in the south.  We stay in touch daily, though, by email.  Anyway, Dave told me about another American that he had met who lives near him.  This guy, along with is wife, goes each year to Alaska and works in the fish processing business.  The money is really good, and there is plenty of work available.

When Dave first told me about this opportunity, I talked to my wife about it, and she was really gung ho to go do it!  My wife, Feyma, is a Dual Citizen (US and Philippines) and thus she can easily go work in the USA.  I thought about going and doing the fish processing work myself as well, but  for a few reasons I decided not to do it:

  1. Because of the health problems that I later encountered, I am unable to do that kind of work right now.
  2. My businesses here in the Philippines would suffer if I were to go for a few months to a place where I did not even have Internet.
  3. One of us needs to be here to “mind the store” so to speak.

With these reasons, Feyma said that she would go for 3 months or so, during the fishing season, and work at one of the fish processing factories.  After talking about it, my 2nd son, Aaron (who is 20 years old) also decided that he wants to take advantage of the opportunity as well.  My 3rd son, Jared, wants to do it as well, but he will be only 17 this year, and you have to be 18 to do that kind of work.  He is definitely up for it next year, though.

So, Feyma will be leaving me and leaving the Philippines for about 3 to 4 months this year, pretty soon in fact.  Feyma is a hard worker and I know she will do well, and I hope Aaron will too, although this will be his first “real job”.  I am sure he will work hard, though.

For people who live in a country like the Philippines, this is a real viable way to make some good money, though.  You have to be a US citizen to get the work, or at least have a green card and permission to work in the USA.  Most of these companies start beginners at $10 per hour, and the overtime is virtually any amount you want.  It is fairly easy, I am told to get 16 hours of work per day, 7 days per week during the season.  At a $10/hr salary, if you work those hours that would be $1480 per week, or $6,402 per month.  Figure 3 months of that and you could come back to the Philippines with $15,000 to $20,000 in your pocket.  Room and Board are paid for the workers in most cases.

With $20,000 in earnings for 3 months work, you could live a pretty nice life in the Philippines for the rest of the year.

Feyma is still looking for a job in Alaska, so if you have connections there, and they are looking for a couple of intelligent and hard workers, please let me know!  We would appreciate it greatly.

We are not really looking to make this permanent and we don’t need to have the income to pay our bills.  We need it to build up our reserves and we have plans to possibly buy a house as well.  Figure 3 or 4 years of this, and it could really add up!

I will be reporting on this from time to time on this site, because it really is a “Way to Make a Living”.

Bob Martin

Bob Martin is the Publisher & Editor in Chief of the Live in the Philippines Web Magazine. Bob is an Internet Entrepreneur. Bob is an American who lived in Mindanao from 2000 until 2019. Bob has now relocated back to the USA.

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Bob Martin
4 years ago
Reply to  Richard Ward

thank you Richard I appreciate the link. Since the time that I wrote the article, Feyma has job interviews lined up with three different processors. But the website will be a good resource in case those don’t work out.

Richard Ward
4 years ago
Reply to  Richard Ward

Bob Martin Sounds like your wife and a few sons want to be Alaskeros… hehehehe

Bob Martin
4 years ago
Reply to  Richard Ward

They want to go there because they can go for just a few months and her nice bit of money. That kind of money will last a long time in the Philippines.

Richard Ward
4 years ago

This is the official Alaskan State website: http://jobs.alaska.gov/seafood/

Tootsie Sonia
4 years ago

I’d like to go there and work.

Bob Martin
4 years ago
Reply to  Tootsie Sonia

Give it a shot, they have a lot of great opportunities.

Tootsie Sonia
4 years ago
Reply to  Tootsie Sonia

I heard it from my friend who just returned from Alaska, Bob

Bob Martin
4 years ago
Reply to  Tootsie Sonia

There are lots of jobs there, and the pay seems to be good too. Especially if you’re willing to work overtime, and there’s lots of overtime available I hear. Feyma wants to go there and work in a month or so, whenever the fishing season starts. Also two of my sons want to do it as well. However one of my sons is only seventeen, and I think you have to be 18 to work at those places. But the other son is 20, and he will likely be going there as well.

Richard Ward
4 years ago
Reply to  Tootsie Sonia

Bob Martin Yes, can make good money. The hourly rate is low, but over time working 10 to 12 hours 7 days a week adds up. And being that one works, eats, and sleep; not much time for spending anything. $9.80 is the minimum wage, so working 70 to over 80 hours aa week will add up fast.

Bob Martin
4 years ago
Reply to  Tootsie Sonia

I heard a lot of those places give you 100 hours pretty routinely for a week.

Richard Ward
4 years ago
Reply to  Tootsie Sonia

Bob Martin if a person is fast at cleaning fish they will give all the hours one can take.

Richard Ward
4 years ago

What Seafood Processors need to know http://jobs.alaska.gov/seafood/prepare-processor.pdf

Bob Martin
4 years ago
Reply to  Richard Ward

Good info

Richard Ward
4 years ago

This is an Alaskan State orientation video which also shows actual people doing the work https://vimeo.com/26733930

Bob Martin
4 years ago
Reply to  Richard Ward

That video is very helpful Richard. Thank you very much for sending that.

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